Bridging the K-12/postsecondary divide with a coherent K-16 system
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Bridging the K-12/postsecondary divide with a coherent K-16 system

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Published by Graduate School of Education, University of Pennsylvania, Consortium for Policy Research in Education, U.S. Dept. of Education, Office of Educational Research and Improvement, Educational Resources Information Center in [Philadelphia, PA], [Washington, DC] .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • College-school cooperation.,
  • Educational change.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Other titlesReporting on issues in education reform
SeriesCPRE policy briefs -- RB-31-June 2000
ContributionsEducational Resources Information Center (U.S.)
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination1 v.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18355457M

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Bridging the K/Postsecondary Divide with a Coherent K System. CPRE Policy Briefs. Consortium for Policy Research in Education, Philadelphia, PA. Get this from a library! Bridging the K/postsecondary divide with a coherent K system.. [Educational Resources Information Center (U.S.);]. Bridging the K/Postsecondary Divide With a Coherent K System. By Consortium for Policy Research in Education. Abstract. This Policy Brief originates from a conference held at Stanford University titled, “Education Reform into the Millennium: The State Legislatures’ Role in Building a Consensus for Systemic Change.” The conference Author: Consortium for Policy Research in Education. Bridging the K/Postsecondary Divide with a Coherent K System. CPRE Policy Briefs. Consortium for Policy Research in Education, Philadelphia, PA. Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC. RB 14p. RU Consortium for Policy Research in Education, Graduate School.

Corresponding Author: FRED M. NEWMANN is Emeritus Professor of Curriculum and Instruction at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. In recent publications he proposes criteria for authentic achievement and assessment and describes how restructuring in schools nationwide affects authentic student achievement, equity, empowerment, professional community, and accountability. Bridging the K/ postsecondary divide with a coherent K system. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania. s review of reform movements in their six states is note-worthy, but as evidenced.   Public schools have traditionally been perceived as a mechanism for bridging the digital divide by providing access to technology and educating student on how to utilize such tools (Attewell, ). Yet, recent reports continue to point to a new divide in access and utilization of mobile devices in U.S. K schools. 9 K refers to Kindergarten through “gr ” or the end of a four-year undergraduate program; many states call their efforts K, or preschool through “grade 16” reforms.

more, a better-integrated K–16 system would allow for greater dialogue between K–12 reformers and postsecondary faculty and administrators, reducing the chance that reform efforts in one sector might be at odds with (or on different tracks from) efforts in another. bridging the great divide 3. Participants included 16 K, postsecondary, legislative and executive leaders. By the end of the discussion, attendees agreed to form the core of an ongoing voluntary P- 16 Council in Tennessee in conjunction with an existing committee of Tennessee Tomorrow (a non-profit business/education advocacy group in Tennessee). The origin of the divide between K–12 and postsecondary education in the United States stems, in part, from the laudable way the nation created education systems to deliver curricula for both K–12 and higher education. In the late s there were no common standards for college admission, nor was there an organized national system for college. At the end of the quarter, the performance of students shall be described in the report card, based on the following levels of proficiency: Developing The student at this level struggles with his/her understanding; prerequisite and fundamental knowledge and or skills have not.